Specializing in social marketing and business communications training

Hello, my name is dumbass

Dunce capSometimes you just have to break out of your shell and do something a bit daring. Hence the title of this post.

In my Social Media travels, I’ve made note of five things that can stop people from reading your blog, visiting your site, connecting with you…and buying from you. 

The  five items below can negatively impact your credibility and online image. Here they are, in no particular order.

1. A Tweet that says “I just worked all day on my new blog post. Read it at________.”  A touch of Jersey sarcasm here, but no one cares about how long you struggled to create your genius post. Just tell me what benefit it offers to me (your reader)–what can I learn from your prose and insights. It’s not about you, silly. It’s all about me.

2. Please RT. I’ve always been a bit rebellious, so don’t tell me what to do. If I like it, I know I can re-tweet it. Now sit down, Skippy.

3. A message or Tweet that says “I need 12 more followers.” Please refer to Rule #14-C in the Social Media handbook. It’s about quality relationships and not quantity. Quit counting and start creating. Then you’ll have plenty of followers and you won’t need to beg. Desperation is very unappealing in the marketplace.

4. A profile that claims you’re a leader in your industry, and you just joined Twitter last month. This raises a red flag. If you’re in marketing, public relations, branding, or advertising, tell me this: Where have you been??

5. A message or headline that includes words like “new” , “trends”, and “top” —and when I click the link, the article or post is a year old. In the digital time zone, that belongs in the Smithsonian.  Take a minute to freshen up your Tweet. Hey, we’re in real time.

I vented. I feel much better. You?

(Photo Credit: Cracker Country Living History)

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Comments

  1. You may not always like the medicine, but you need to take it. Good post. I’ll RT because you didn’t request it.

  2. I couldn’t agree more. Don’t ask me to pimp your product, service or event. Save Please RT for public safety issues, like severe weather warnings, missing children, escaped convicts, shooters, etc. As you said, if I think it’s RT-worthy I’ll tell my friends.

    In fact, I recently did my own rant on “Please RT”. http://joecascio.net/joecblog/2010/11/02/please-rt-please-just-dont/

  3. Sue–Here’s the Me-Me-Me of self involved social media. To use today’s nicer child-friendly language, please take a time-out until you figure out how to participate. Happy marketing, Heidi Cohen

  4. “No one cares about how long you struggled to create your genius post … It’s not about you, silly. It’s all about me.”

    “It’s about quality relationships.”

    Quality relationships, presumably, are those in which other people focus entirely on us, and we refuse to empathize with them or, in fact, take any interest in them whatsoever. Other people, of course, are no doubt dying to know about our every hiccup.

  5. I like your post Susan. It reminds of the silly business owners out there that actually pay people to get them followers and the hacks that operate a follower guaranteed business.

    Social media is like organic search engine optimization, your presence will grow naturally if you implement the right techniques.

    -Rachel

  6. Love it … such a well written post and so to the point. Thanks for bringing a “marketing” smile to my face this Saturday afternoon. Jim.

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